Womb Ecology

The Mid-Pacific Conference on Birth and Primal Health Research took place on October 26-28, 2012, at the prestigious Hawaii Convention Center, in Honolulu, a meeting point between Western and Eastern cultures. Recent technical and scientific advances that will influence the history of childbirth and the history of Homo sapiens were presented by the most authoritative avant-garde speakers from the five continents. Spread the word thanks to this recording.

Birth Around the World was there also filming!

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Contrasts – Episode IV of the Series Birth Around the World

Next Sunday we will travel to the the extremes of the world and find out some more about the CONTRAST during child labor. On one hand we have countries with high technology and infrastructure and on the other hand we encounter with lack basic resources. U.S., Vietnam, Germany to Nepal we will see cultural diversity and public policies that lead us down to this different paths.
Birth the World!! Sunday, May 26 at 11:30pm on GNT

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“Diversity serves as a means by which we can learn and evolve” Birth Around the World

You can watch online in the link
You have to presss the full screen mode.

If you haven’t had the opportunity to watch the previous episodes, we have available online a piece of each one of the episodes! Hope you like it!!!

Birth Around The World – Episode III – Revolution

Revolution, our third episode will be on tv next sunday, May 19 11:30pm (brazilian time) at GNT. We have special interviews with the doctor and researcher Michel Odent, Ina May, Janet Balaskasand and Robin Lim! Passing by Indonesia, United States, England and New Zealand we’ll visit places that are living a revolution. Let’s see inspiring realities and who is behind them.

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“The importance of the revolution is to expand the opportunities available to women of how she wants to give birth to her baby” Birth Around the World

You can watch online in the link
You have to presss the full screen mode.

Parto Pelo Mundo – Birth Around The World – Episode: Transitions

The second program will be today, May 12 at 11:30pm, GNT (Brasil time).
Very special day because it is Mother’s Day and Nurse’s Day!

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In the next program we will travel to countries undergoing a transition, showing Nepal, Cambodia, Japan and Australia.. In which direction is heading this change?

“The world is in constant transition, and one of the most important in our lives is BIRTH” Birth Around the World

You can watch online in the link
You have to presss the full screen mode.

Birth Around the World Series – First episode

At the Midwives Day, May 5th, premiered the first episode of Parto Pelo Mundo.

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The series “Parto pelo Mundo” (Birth Around the World) presents the many facets of birth through a journey around the world.
Mayra Calvette, a nurse-midwife, and her husband, Enrico Ferrari, embarked on an adventurous journey, which lasted the period of a pregnancy, visiting 25 countries for over nine months.
This new TV series is the result of this experience. It is an intimate, unique and personal record of various societies and how birth happens around the globe.
“Parto pelo Mundo” is a new look at the world we live in by the way we’ve got into it.

You can see a piece here

Birth Around the World Series premiere May 5th

It’s with great joy and excitement that we announce the premiere of Birth Around the World Series – “Parto pelo Mundo” on May 5th at 11pm on GNT!a local TV channel from Brazil!!
Produced by Cinevideo Produções

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Childbirth, anywhere in the world, is a remarkable event that deeply transforms the lives of all involved. An experience that is both common and distinct to all human beings in each and every society.

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The series “Parto pelo Mundo” (Birth Around the World) presents the many facets of birth through a journey around the world.

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Mayra Calvette, a nurse-midwife, and her husband, Enrico Ferrari, embarked on an adventurous journey, which lasted the period of a pregnancy, visiting 25 countries for over nine months.

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This new TV series is the result of this experience. It is an intimate, unique and personal record of various societies and how birth happens around the globe. Different points of view guided by the same concerns of a healthy, happy and safe birth for both mother and baby.

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Liepzig - visita pós parto com Birke

The couple visited many dwellings and saw children being born in the middle of rice fields in Camboja, others being blessed by butter in Tibet, as well as many more being born in hospital with all the leading technology available today.

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They’ve interviewed physicians, nurses, midwives, doulas, fathers and mothers. Women who have revolutionized the health system in New Zealand and those who’ve decided to live in the margins of healthcare in the United States. Furthermore, they’ve investigated the big movement that is currently happening in their home country, Brazil.

Entrevista com Birke Heinrich - Liepzig - Alemanha

Shonan Atsugi

College of Midwives

Visiting clinics, maternity homes, hospitals, villas and residences they’ve created a valuable memoir that displays the birth features of many nations. Interviews were recorded, vídeos, photos, and a travel journal were produced gathering important data of the healthcare system of each one of the country’s visited.

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This quest has been intertwined with common activities of a newlywed couple who travels the world experiencing different cultures, practicing sports and viewing unforgettable places of our planet.

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Mayra and Enrico are now back to their homeland to share this experience. “Parto pelo Mundo” is a new look at the world we live in by the way we’ve got into it.

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Join us, be inspired and part of this movement!

Together we are stronger!

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The Happiness in the Kingdom of Bhutan

I could feel the place’s peace rigth the way. A feeling as if I had returned to the past in a time machine. A typical small airport, but the only international airport in the country. Our guide and driver welcomed us with great gentleness and tranquility. You need a guide and driver to be allowed in the country, tourism is very organized and restricted.

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Bhutan is located between China to the north and west, and India to the east and south. It is a small and curious country, with a population of about 700000 inhabitants. The most important index is the Gross National Happiness (GNH). Being possible to assess the country in a sustainable and less materialistic way. The country has a constitutional monarchy, with the King very respected and popular.

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We visited beautiful places, like Taktshang Monastery or Tiger’s Nest. The temple was built in the 17th century, the cave where Guru Padmasambhava, who is said to have meditated for three years, three months, three weeks, three days and three hours in the 8th century. The influence of Buddhism is evident, the culture is focused on Buddhist philosophy and the preservation of Bhutanese traditions.

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On the return of Tiger’s Nest journey there were some women selling some typical products and I asked them how the babies are born there. They said, a little embarrassed to talk about it, they were born at home with the help of the grandmother or another experienced woman who has gone through the experience, they traditionally do not have midwives as profession. I asked her position and showed the kneeling position supported in front.

Home birth is still very common, the introduction of childbirth at hospitals is still very recent. There is an incentive for women to have their babies in hospital. Time was short, but I managed to visit the hospital in the capital. Even the hospital has typical construction. Birth happens in the delivery room, in gynecological position, with a typical and “modern” hospital care, with a certain coldness, as if it were a sign of modernization.

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After knowing the Takin, typical animal of Bhutan, my perception was confirmed through an interview with a traditional family who lived near the takins. They chose to have their babies at home, even living near the hospital. We talked while they were still loom. The grandmother was the one who attended the births, was very important to have her mother by her side. They felt that the house was very cozy and were more hesitant to go to the hospital, on a cold and unfamiliar, strange people that often treat women badly during childbirth, as they heard. The placenta is sacred and most often buried in a special place, where it will be protected from other animals. Maternal mortality is still very high, there are still many villages in remote areas without access to the health center if necessary.

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Bhutan was one of the countries that I was mostly enchanted, with their traditions still very alive, as well as the conservation of nature, culture and simplicity of life. But we feel that the modernization process is happening quickly. Young people are very attracted to the western lifestyle, television, internet, Hollywood movies, parties. It was one of the last countries to open up to internet and television in 1999, for example. One concern of the King, who warned that the misuse of television could erode Bhutanese values and traditions.

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It is a challenge to achieve this balance with tradition and modernization, including childbirth, where modernization can increase safety and that the traditions are kept during this important moment that is Birth.

Birth Rate: 18.75 births/1,000 population (2012 est.)
Maternal Mortality: 180 deaths/100,000 live births (2010)
Infant Mortality: 42.17 deaths/1,000 live births (2010)
Neonatal Mortality: 33 deaths/1, 000 live births (2009)

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Published at Gisele’s Blog

Singapore: The Asian NY

After Bali we passed by Singapore. It was a quick visit, therefore intense.

Singapore is located in South of Malaysia. It was founded as a British trading colony in 1819 and became independent in 1965. Singapore became one of the world’s most prosperous countries with strong international trading. It is sometimes called the Asian NY. It’ is a small and high developed country. You can smell business. Very organized, clean, with big and fancy buildings. But also many parks where people can go for a relaxing time. It is considered one of the best cities to live. Also a very expensive place to live.

There are people from all over the world living there and on transit. I has a population of 5 millions of inhabitants. Most population is Chinese (76.8%), followed by Malay (13.9%) and Indian (7.9%). The first language is English and the second is Mandarin.

In Singapore to have a car is not very common. It’s very expensive to buy and to maintain it. So most people use public transportation which is good. There are so many taxis, but people use so much that is not easy to find a free one, we had a hard time! But we learned that you have to call them to pick you up. Good strategy for the traffic. Another curiosity is that is hard to find chew gum! You can get it in a pharmacy and must complete a form when you purchase it and show id.

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We went up the famous Skypark. It is a building on the top of the Marina Bay Sands hotel. It is crazy what human mind can imagine! It is a boat on the top of three buildings. From there you can see Singapore as a miniature… beautiful and crazy!

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We also saw an amazing water show on Marina Bay Sands… light, music, and colors! I was also a Cinema on Water full of color and life! The story was beautiful. It was showing life. From birth to the end of life.
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The first night we went out to eat crab with Charisse and Yen, that are from Singapore, Enrico used to work with Charisse’s brother in the US. It was a great dinner and we got to know little bit more about Singapore culture and also about the birth from their point view. They told me it’s very expensive to have babies in Singapore, the hospital bill is high and also the cost of life to sustain a child. Also women are very busy with the working life, not much time for having a baby. They said Chinese culture is one of the most selfish ones.

Many of their friends have had c-section. They were very inclined to have a c-section or an epidural when would be time for them to have kids, because they were so afraid of birth. They just had no idea about the benefits of the natural and undisturbed birth process.. well, now I think they have 😉

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This year is the Year of the Dragon, according to the Chinese horoscope. Historically, Singapore has a baby boom every Dragon year, which comes round every 12 years. So the competition is even higher. The pregnant couples already register their unborn child into the preschool to ensure the baby gets a place there when the time comes.

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In the next two posts you will read about birth in Singapore and about the movement for a better birth!