Birth Around the World Series premiere May 5th Série Parto Pelo Mundo estréia dia 5 de maio no GNT

It’s with great joy and excitement that we announce the premiere of Birth Around the World Series – “Parto pelo Mundo” on May 5th at 11pm on GNT!a local TV channel from Brazil!!
Produced by Cinevideo Produções

Lake Wanaka

Childbirth, anywhere in the world, is a remarkable event that deeply transforms the lives of all involved. An experience that is both common and distinct to all human beings in each and every society.

Camboja

The series “Parto pelo Mundo” (Birth Around the World) presents the many facets of birth through a journey around the world.

DSC09539

Mayra Calvette, a nurse-midwife, and her husband, Enrico Ferrari, embarked on an adventurous journey, which lasted the period of a pregnancy, visiting 25 countries for over nine months.

DSC08361

This new TV series is the result of this experience. It is an intimate, unique and personal record of various societies and how birth happens around the globe. Different points of view guided by the same concerns of a healthy, happy and safe birth for both mother and baby.

DSC09701

Liepzig - visita pós parto com Birke

The couple visited many dwellings and saw children being born in the middle of rice fields in Camboja, others being blessed by butter in Tibet, as well as many more being born in hospital with all the leading technology available today.

DSC00189

DSC00186

They’ve interviewed physicians, nurses, midwives, doulas, fathers and mothers. Women who have revolutionized the health system in New Zealand and those who’ve decided to live in the margins of healthcare in the United States. Furthermore, they’ve investigated the big movement that is currently happening in their home country, Brazil.

Entrevista com Birke Heinrich - Liepzig - Alemanha

Shonan Atsugi

College of Midwives

Visiting clinics, maternity homes, hospitals, villas and residences they’ve created a valuable memoir that displays the birth features of many nations. Interviews were recorded, vídeos, photos, and a travel journal were produced gathering important data of the healthcare system of each one of the country’s visited.

DSC05895

DSC04902

DSC03457

DSC03366

This quest has been intertwined with common activities of a newlywed couple who travels the world experiencing different cultures, practicing sports and viewing unforgettable places of our planet.

West Coast - New Zealand

DSC03419

Camboja

Mayra and Enrico are now back to their homeland to share this experience. “Parto pelo Mundo” is a new look at the world we live in by the way we’ve got into it.

Camboja

Join us, be inspired and part of this movement!

Together we are stronger!

The Big TreeCom muitaaaaa alegria que anunciamos a Estréia da série Parto Pelo Mundo dia 5 de maio às 23:30 na GNT!!! Serão 5 episódios de 26 minutos, com um novo episódio todos os domingos, às 23:30.
Com produção especial da Cinevideo Produções

Lake Wanaka

Em qualquer lugar do planeta o nascimento de uma criança é um acontecimento marcante que modifica profundamente a vida dos envolvidos. Uma experiência que é comum a todos os seres humanos, mas que acontece de modo bastante diverso em cada sociedade.

Camboja

A série “Parto pelo mundo” mostra as muitas facetas do nascimento através de uma viagem de volta ao mundo.

DSC09539

A enfermeira parteira Mayra Calvette e seu marido, o empresário Enrico Ferrari empreenderam essa jornada de nove meses por 25 países, o tempo de uma gestação.

DSC08361

A série é o resultado dessa experiência, um registro único e pessoal de diversas sociedades e do modo como elas lidam com os nascimentos. Pontos de vistas tão diferentes guiados pela mesma preocupação com um nascimento saudável, feliz e seguro para a mãe e bebê.

DSC09701

Liepzig - visita pós parto com Birke

Viram crianças que nasciam em meio de plantações de arroz no Camboja, outras abençoadas pela manteiga do Lama no Tibet e ainda as que nasciam no hospital com toda tecnologia disponível.

DSC00189

DSC00186

Entrevistaram médicos, enfermeiras, parteiras, doulas, pais e mães. Mulheres que revolucionaram o sistema de saúde da Nova Zelândia e as que decidiram viver à margem dele nos Estados Unidos. Além disso, registraram o grande movimento que está acontecendo no próprio Brasil.

Entrevista com Birke Heinrich - Liepzig - Alemanha

Shonan Atsugi

College of Midwives

Visitaram clínicas, casas de parto, hospitais, vilas e residências. Produziram vídeos, fotos e um diário de viagem, onde registraram aspectos da cultura, relatos de parto e dados do sistema de saúde de cada país visitado.

DSC05895

DSC04902

DSC03457

DSC03366

Intercalaram a pesquisa com atividades comuns de um jovem casal que viaja pelo mundo: praticaram esportes, conheceram culturas diferentes, visitaram lugares inesquecíveis.

West Coast - New Zealand

DSC03419

Camboja

Agora voltaram pra dividir essa experiência.
“Parto pelo mundo” é uma maneira de conhecer o mundo pelo modo que chegamos nele.

Camboja

Nos acompanhe, se inspire e faça parte também desse movimento!

Unidos somos uma força muito maior!

The Big Tree

Interview to NT RepórterEntrevista para NT Repórter

Nessa entrevista eu e Enrico compartilhamos um pouco sobre o parto pelo mundo. Essa matéria também traz informações sobre a escola de obstetrícia da USP e a experiência de uma senhora que teve experiência negativas de seus partos.
[tubepress video=’8hkLqKaV_4U’ theme=’youtube’ descriptionLimit=’0′]Nessa entrevista eu e Enrico compartilhamos um pouco sobre o parto pelo mundo. Essa matéria também traz informações sobre a escola de obstetrícia da USP e a experiência de uma senhora que teve experiência negativas de seus partos.
[tubepress video=’8hkLqKaV_4U’ theme=’youtube’ descriptionLimit=’0′]

NepalNepal

Cars and motorbikes everywhere, horning all the time! The taxi driver had to swerve because there was a cow in the middle of the street, lounging in the sun, in the midle of urban chaos of Kathmandu, Nepal. The cow is a sacred animal in Nepal. Kathmandu is the capital and most populous city.

DSC09684

We visited many temples and got to know about the culture, religion and customs. The agriculture-based economy. The main religions are Hinduism (80%) and Buddhism (10%).

DSC09642

DSC09434

Home birth assisted by traditional midwives is still very common, especially in the remote villages where the access is limited, with the total of 82% home birth in the country, in urban areas is about 50% (2006), but the conditions are not very favorable, with lack of access to hospital if necessary, lack of training and materials.

There is a great incentive for mother give birth in institutions, the care is free and the mothers receive 1000 rupi ($ 10) for the birth, but they only receive after birth. This is a way they found to increase births in hospital and achieve the Millennium Development Goal number 5 of the UN, which is three-quarters of decreasing maternal mortality by 2015. The maternal mortality rate went down from 539 (1996) to 281 (2006) per 100,000 live births (2006), neonatal mortality is 33 per 1000 live births. The c-section rate is very low, about 2.9% (2006), which shows a lack of access to hospitals. Moreover the rate in urban areas is higher, and some are elective c-section.

I went to hospital in central Kathmandu where the nurse took me for a visit at the Birth rooms, postpartum rooms and also to see the Kangaroo careroom.

DSC00287

I took off my shoes and put a specific one and walked into the Birth room. There were several women in labor with a companion, separated by plastic partitions. I attended two births in a period of 40 minutes. The midwives attend all deliveries. But I felt the saw a mechanic interventionist care. Then they invited me for a tea and I could talk a little more with them. They knew nothing of humanized birth, natural methods of pain relief, different positions for birth. One of the nurses even made an elective caesarean of her daughter, who is now 1 year, so I don’t need to “suffer,” she said. I spoke to them about humanized childbirth that they could adopt, that happens in developed countries and brings many benefits to mother, babies and greater satisfaction for the professional as well! They were interested with this idea.

DSC00317

In the middle of traffic, the cab, I interviewed the president of Midwives Society of of Nepal (Midson). It is a new organization and they are planning on courses for direct entry midwives. Another goal is to humanize birth assistance during birth which is still a very new idea in the hospitals. They also want to replace the lay midwives by professionals midwives in rural areas.

I visited the only birth center of Nepal Aadharbhut Prasuti Sewa (APS), a non-profit NGO established in July 2007. I was very well received by the local midwife, who is one of the founders, and also by a volunteer midwife from England.

They provide care to women and children, including prenatal, birth, postpartum and family planning. It is also a training center for midwives and students, because education is very limited. The major goal is the reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality in Nepal.

They told me that women do not usually get naked during labor, they just lift the skirt when the baby is born. Childbirth happens with the woman lying in bed, but are learning about humanization of childbirth. The water birth is not an option due to lack of water, but also women do not like to be naked. After a few hours the mothers go home and almost all breastfeed their babies.

There are many rituals involved during childbirth, which is the one of the most important rites of passage. Among the Newars, the ethnic group that lives in the Kathmandu valley, the mother gives birth in a dark and quiet room. After birth mother and baby are in retreat in the room for few days. The midwife, Aji, also makes prayers and invokes the protective influence of the Goddess. The placenta is called ‘bush-co-satthi’ which means friend of the baby, she is usually buried. Between four and twelve days after the birth happens a ritual where the baby is formally presented to his family and gets its name. Mothers learn to massage their babies from their mothers.

DSC00264

I hope that Nepal achieves the Millennium Development Goal of the United Nations, and more women have access to healthy food, clean water, and also to health facilities and c-section when they are necessary, but that humanized care can be provided and traditions are preserved, because this is the richness of each culture.

DSC09759

Published at Gisele’s BlogCarros e motos por todos os lados, buzinando o tempo todo! O taxista teve que desviar, pois havia uma vaca no meio da rua, descansando ao sol, no meio daquele caos urbano de Katmandu, Nepal. A vaca é um animal sagrado no Nepal. Katmandu é a capital e a cidade mais populosa.

DSC09684

Visitamos muitos templos e conhecemos um pouco sobre a cultura, religião e costumes do local. A agricultura é a base da economia. As principais religiões são o Hinduísmo (80%) e Budismo (10%).

DSC09642

DSC09434

O parto em casa assistido por parteiras tradicionais ainda é muito comum, principalmente nas vilas mais distantes onde o acesso é limitado, totalizando cerca de 82% de parto em casa no país, sendo que nas áreas urbanas é cerca de 50% (2006), mas as condições não são muito favoráveis, pela falta de acesso ao hospital se necessário, falta de treinamento e material esterilizado.

Há um grande incentivo para que os partos aconteçam em instituições, o cuidado é de graça e as mães recebem 1000 rupi pelo parto (10 dólares), mas elas só recebem depois do parto. Essa é uma forma que eles encontraram de aumentar os partos no hospital e alcançar a Meta de Desenvolvimento do Milênio número 5 da ONU, que é diminuir três quartos da mortalidade maternal até 2015. O índice de mortalidade materna é de 281 por 100,000 nascidos vivos (2006), a mortalidade neonatal é de 33 por 1000 nascidos vivos. O índice de cesarianas é bem baixo, cerca de 2,9% (2006), o que mostra a falta de acesso aos hospitais. Por outro lado nas áreas urbanas o índice é superior, e algumas cesarianas são eletivas.

Fui no hospital no centro de Katmandu, onde a enfermeira local me levou para uma visita pelo Centro Obstétrico, quartos pós parto e quarto de cuidado Canguru.

DSC00287

Tirei meu tênis e entrei no Centro Obstétrico. Havia várias mulheres em trabalho de parto com um acompanhante, separadas por divisórias. Assisti dois partos em um período de 40 minutos. As enfermeiras obstetras que atendem todos os partos. Mas senti que é de uma forma mais mecânica e intervencionista. Depois elas me convidaram para tomar um chá e pude conversar um pouco com elas. Elas não sabiam nada sobre parto humanizado, métodos naturais de alívio da dor, posições para o parto. Uma das enfermeiras inclusive fez uma cesárea eletiva da sua filha, que hoje tem 1 ano, para não precisar “sofrer”, segundo ela. Falei, de forma sutil, sobre o parto humanizado que eles poderiam adotar, como é nos países desenvolvidos e que traz muitos benefícios para mãe, bebê e também maior satisfação para o profissional! Elas ficaram interessadas com essa idéia.

DSC00317

No meio do trânsito, no táxi, entrevistei a presidente da Sociedade de Parteiras do Nepal (MIDSON). É uma organização nova e está se organizando para criar cursos de parteiras profissionais, ou obstetriz. Não há nenhum curso de entrada direta no Nepal, o que existe são enfermeiras obstetras. Outra meta da sociedade é humanizar a assistência durante o nascimento que ainda é um conceito muito novo e pouco conhecido. Eles também querem substituir as parteiras tradicionais pelas profissionais nas áreas rurais.

Visitei a única casa de parto do Nepal, Aadharbhut Prasuti Sewa (APS), uma ONG sem fins lucrativos criada em Julho de 2007. Fui muito bem recebida pela parteira local, que foi uma das fundadoras, e também havia uma parteira voluntária da Inglaterra.

Eles oferecem cuidado à mulher e criança, incluindo pré natal, parto, pós parto e planejamento familiar. Também é um centro de treinamento para parteiras e estudantes, pois a educação é bastante limitada. Um dos principais objetivos é a diminuição da mortalidade materna e neonatal no Nepal.

Elas me contaram que as mulheres não costumam ficar nuas durante o parto, apenas levantam a saia na hora do bebê nascer. E o parto acontece com a mulher deitada na cama, mesmo lá a assistência ao parto segue o modelo ocidental, com medicação, mas estão aprendendo sobre humanização do parto. O parto na água não é uma opção, pela falta de água, mas também por que as mulheres não gostam de ficar nuas. Depois de algumas horas, as mães vão para casa e praticamente todas amamentam seus bebês.

DSC00264

Há muitos rituais envolvidos durante o nascimento, que é dos mais importantes ritos de passagem. Entre os Newars, grupo étnico que mora no vale de Katmandu, a mãe dá à luz em um quarto escuro e silencioso, somente com mulheres. Depois do parto, mãe e bebê ficam em retiro no quarto. A parteira, Aji, também faz as rezas e invoca a influência protetora da Deusa. A placenta é chamada de ‘bucha-co-satthi’ que significa amiga do bebê, ela é geralmente enterrada.

Entre quatro e doze dias após o nascimento, acontece um ritual em que o bebê é formalmente apresentado para a sua família e recebe o seu nome.

Espero que o Nepal consiga atingir a Meta de Desenvolvimento do Milênio da ONU, que mais mulheres tenham acesso ao hospital e à cesariana quando necessário, mas que uma assistência humanizada seja prestada e as tradições sejam preservadas, pois essa é a riqueza de cada cultura.

DSC09759

Publicado no Blog da Gisele

The Happiness in the Kingdom of BhutanA felicidade no Reino do Butão

I could feel the place’s peace rigth the way. A feeling as if I had returned to the past in a time machine. A typical small airport, but the only international airport in the country. Our guide and driver welcomed us with great gentleness and tranquility. You need a guide and driver to be allowed in the country, tourism is very organized and restricted.

IMG_3661

Bhutan is located between China to the north and west, and India to the east and south. It is a small and curious country, with a population of about 700000 inhabitants. The most important index is the Gross National Happiness (GNH). Being possible to assess the country in a sustainable and less materialistic way. The country has a constitutional monarchy, with the King very respected and popular.

IMG_3755

We visited beautiful places, like Taktshang Monastery or Tiger’s Nest. The temple was built in the 17th century, the cave where Guru Padmasambhava, who is said to have meditated for three years, three months, three weeks, three days and three hours in the 8th century. The influence of Buddhism is evident, the culture is focused on Buddhist philosophy and the preservation of Bhutanese traditions.

IMG_3695

On the return of Tiger’s Nest journey there were some women selling some typical products and I asked them how the babies are born there. They said, a little embarrassed to talk about it, they were born at home with the help of the grandmother or another experienced woman who has gone through the experience, they traditionally do not have midwives as profession. I asked her position and showed the kneeling position supported in front.

Home birth is still very common, the introduction of childbirth at hospitals is still very recent. There is an incentive for women to have their babies in hospital. Time was short, but I managed to visit the hospital in the capital. Even the hospital has typical construction. Birth happens in the delivery room, in gynecological position, with a typical and “modern” hospital care, with a certain coldness, as if it were a sign of modernization.

IMG_3898

After knowing the Takin, typical animal of Bhutan, my perception was confirmed through an interview with a traditional family who lived near the takins. They chose to have their babies at home, even living near the hospital. We talked while they were still loom. The grandmother was the one who attended the births, was very important to have her mother by her side. They felt that the house was very cozy and were more hesitant to go to the hospital, on a cold and unfamiliar, strange people that often treat women badly during childbirth, as they heard. The placenta is sacred and most often buried in a special place, where it will be protected from other animals. Maternal mortality is still very high, there are still many villages in remote areas without access to the health center if necessary.

DSC09922

Bhutan was one of the countries that I was mostly enchanted, with their traditions still very alive, as well as the conservation of nature, culture and simplicity of life. But we feel that the modernization process is happening quickly. Young people are very attracted to the western lifestyle, television, internet, Hollywood movies, parties. It was one of the last countries to open up to internet and television in 1999, for example. One concern of the King, who warned that the misuse of television could erode Bhutanese values and traditions.

IMG_3750

It is a challenge to achieve this balance with tradition and modernization, including childbirth, where modernization can increase safety and that the traditions are kept during this important moment that is Birth.

Birth Rate: 18.75 births/1,000 population (2012 est.)
Maternal Mortality: 180 deaths/100,000 live births (2010)
Infant Mortality: 42.17 deaths/1,000 live births (2010)
Neonatal Mortality: 33 deaths/1, 000 live births (2009)

IMG_3605

Published at Gisele’s BlogCheguei e já pude senti a paz do lugar. Uma sensação de que havia voltado no tempo. O Butão é um museu a céu aberto. O aeroporto é pequeno e possui arquitetura típica do Butão, sendo o único aeroporto internacional do país. O nosso guia e motorista nos recepcionaram com muita gentileza e tranquilidade, com as ventimentas Butanesas, chamadas de “ghos”. Você precisa de um guia e motorista para passear no país, o turismo é muito organizado e restrito.

IMG_3661

Butão se localiza entre a China ao norte e oeste, e a Índia ao leste e sul. É um país pequeno e curioso, com uma população de cerca de 700 000 habitantes. O índice mais importante é da Felicidade Interna Bruta (FIB). Sendo possível avaliar o país de forma sustentável e menos materialista. O país possui uma monarquia constitucional, sendo o Rei muito respeitado e popular. O ar é puro, a natureza exuberante, as águas cristalinas dos rios correm naturalmente.

IMG_3755

Visitamos lugares belíssimos, como o Mosteiro Taktshang ou Ninho do Tigre. Quatro horas de caminhada, vale cada passo dado. O templo foi construído no século 17, na caverna onde o Guru Padmasambhava, que meditou por três anos, três meses, três semanas, três dias e três horas no século 8. A influência do Budismo no país é evidente, a cultura é voltada à filosofia budista e à preservação das tradições butanesas.

IMG_3695

Noo retorno da caminhada haviam mulheres vendendo alguns artesanatos típicos e eu perguntei como os bebês nascem por lá. Elas disseram, um pouco envergonhadas de falar no assunto, que elas nasceram em casa, com a ajuda da avó ou de alguma mulher que já tenha passado pela experiência, elas não têm parteiras típicas. Perguntei a posição e ela mostrou a posição de joelhos apoiada na frente.

O parto em casa é ainda muito comum, pois introdução do parto no hospital ainda é muito recente. Há um incentivo para que as mulheres tenham seus bebês no hospital. O tempo era curto, mas consegui visitar o hospital da capital. O parto acontece na sala de parto, em posição ginecológica, com uma assistência hospitalar nos mesmos padrões ocidentais, mas ao mesmo tempo com uma certa frieza, como se fosse um sinal de modernização.

IMG_3898

Depois de conhecer o Takin, animal típico do Butão, minha percepção foi confirmada através de uma entrevista com uma família tradicional que optou ter seus bebês em casa, mesmo morando perto do hospital. Conversávamos enquanto elas continuavam o tear. A avó foi quem assistiu os partos em casa, para a mãe era muito importante ter sua mãe ao seu lado. Elas sentiam que a casa era muito mais aconchegante e ficavam envergonhadas de ir para o hospital, em um ambiente frio e desconhecido, pessoas estranhas que muitas vezes tratam as mulheres mal durante o parto. A placenta é sagrada e na maioria das vezes enterrada em um lugar especial, onde vai estar protegida de outros animais. A mortalidade materna ainda é muito alta, ainda há muitas vilas em áreas isoladas, sem acesso ao centro de saúde se for necessário.

DSC09922

Butão foi um dos países que mais me encantou, por suas tradições ainda muito vivas, assim como a conservação da natureza, da cultura e simplicidade de viver. Mas sentimos que o processo de modernização está acontecendo rapidamente. Os jovens estão muito atraídos pelo estilo de vida ocidental, televisão, internet, filmes de Hollywood, festas. Foi um dos últimos países a se abrir para televisão e internet, em 1999. Uma preocupação do Rei, que alertou que o uso indevido da televisão poderia corroer os valores e tradições butanesas.

IMG_3750

É um desafio que eles estão passando de conseguir balancear as tradições e a modernização, inclusive na hora do nascimento, para que aumente a segurança e que as tradições sejam mantidas durante esse momento tão especial.

Taxa de natalidade: 18,75 nascimentos / 1.000 habitantes (est. 2012)
Mortalidade Materna: 180 mortes/100 000 nascidos vivos (2010)
Mortalidade infantil: 42,17 mortes / mil nascimentos (2010)
Mortalidade neonatal: 33 mortes / 1, 000 nascimentos (2009)

IMG_3605

Publicado no Blog da Gisele

Stork Network – Towards a new model of care Rede Cegonha – Por um novo modelo de assistência

Brazil is currently undergoing major changes in obstetric care. The movement for childbirth humanization is growing and getting stronger every day.

To give the necessary assistance to pregnant women and their children, the Ministry of Health launched in March 2011, the Stork Network strategy, composed of a set of measures to ensure all Brazilians, from the SUS (Brazilian public health system), adequate, safe and humane assistance from confirmation of pregnancy, through prenatal and childbirth, until the first two years of baby’s life. All Brazilian states have joined the Stork Network strategy.

The Stork Network, established under the National Public Health System, is a network of care that aims to ensure women’s right to reproductive planning and humanized assistance during pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum and abortion, as well for the child’s rights of a safe birth and healthy growth and development.

The Ministry of Health is investing $ 4,640 billion until 2014. These funds are invested in building a network care for women and children. “We have to build a welcoming environment for women to feel more secure at this time and, therefore, it is necessary to qualify the physical space and changing practices,” emphasizes the technical area coordinator of Women’s Health, Esther Vilela.

Prenatal care is a priority in the Basic Health Units (BHU). This is where the realization of all the care and prenatal testing happen. Also, at this time, the woman will make the link with maternity and will know, from the first months, where she will have her baby. Because what happens sometimes in Brazil is the lack of vacancies in public maternities, and the pregnant woman has to go from one place to another in labor.

During childbirth Stork Network qualifies health teams to provide humanized and skilled service. There’s a reception with risk classification, comfortable and safe environment for the woman and baby, focusing on quality and humanization of childbirth. A woman has the right to have a companion during labor and special assistance in the event of a high risk pregnancy. Furthermore, the strategy ensures humanized attention to women in an abortion situation. The Stork Network is funding 100% of the construction and funding of Birth Centers and House of the mother, baby and puerpera, 80% of funding for expansion and qualification of beds (ICU, Kangaroo care) and funding the ambience for delivery room in the hospitals, so they can be more welcoming and have “PPP” room (pre birth, birth and postpartum) for the woman in labor to stay in the same room during the process of giving birth.

During the postpartum, Stork Network accompanies the growth and development of children from 0-24 months of age. There is guidance on all necessary care for the woman and her baby, promoting breastfeeding and monitoring of the vaccination calendar. Additionally, moms can have access to information and availability of family planning methods, consultations and educational activities.

Let’s be part of this change! We must take the moment and the Federal Government investment! For this we need committed people who take this project forward so that the Stork Network strategy can be implemented in your city! The world is made of people, we need to make our part so the change can take place.O Brasil está passando por momento importante de mudanças na assistência obstétrica. O movimento pela humanização do parto cresce e se fortalece a cada dia.

Para dar a assistência necessária às gestantes e seus filhos, o Ministério da Saúde lançou, em março de 2011, a estratégia Rede Cegonha, composta por um conjunto de medidas para garantir a todas as brasileiras, pelo Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS), atendimento adequado, seguro e humanizado desde a confirmação da gravidez, passando pelo pré-natal e o parto, até os dois primeiros anos de vida do bebê. Todos os estados brasileiros já aderiram à estratégia.

A Rede Cegonha, instituída no âmbito do Sistema Único de Saúde, consiste numa rede de cuidados que visa assegurar à mulher o direito ao planejamento reprodutivo e à atenção humanizada à gravidez, ao parto, ao puerpério e ao abortamento, bem como o direito ao nascimento seguro, ao crescimento e ao desenvolvimento saudáveis. Conta com R$ 9,397 bilhões do orçamento do Ministério da Saúde para investimentos até 2014. Esses recursos são aplicados na construção de uma rede de cuidados à mulher e à criança. “Temos que construir um ambiente acolhedor para que a mulher se sinta mais segura nesse momento e, para isso, é necessário a qualificação do espaço físico e a mudança das práticas”, enfatiza a coordenadora da área técnica de Saúde da Mulher, Esther Vilela.

No pré natal há uma prioridade de atendimento nas Unidades Básicas de Saúde (UBS). É nela que há a realização de todo os cuidados e exames pré-natais. Também, será neste momento, que a mulher fará a vinculação com uma maternidade e saberá, desde os primeiros meses, onde terá o seu bebê.

Durante o parto a Rede Cegonha qualifica as equipes de saúde para prestação de atendimento humanizado e especializado. Há o acolhimento com classificação de risco, ambiente confortável e seguro para a mulher e o bebê e foco na humanização e qualidade do parto. A mulher tem o direito a um acompanhante durante o parto e atendimento especial no caso de uma gravidez de risco. Além disso, a estratégia garante atenção humanizada às mulheres em situação de abortamento. A Rede Cegonha está financiando 100% da construção e custeio do ?Centro de Parto Normal (CPN) e Casa da gestante, bebê e puérpera (CGB); 80% de custeio para ampliação e qualificação dos leitos (UTI, Canguru) e financiando a ambiência para os locais de parto, para que as maternidades sejam mais acolhedoras e disponham de quarto PPP(pré parto, parto e pós parto) para que a mulher em trabalho de parto fique no mesmo ambiente durante todo o processo de parir.

Durante o pós-parto a Rede Cegonha acompanha o crescimento e desenvolvimento da criança de 0 a 24 meses de idade. Há a orientação sobre todos os cuidados necessários para a mulher e seu bebê, promoção e incentivo ao aleitamento materno e acompanhamento do calendário de vacinação. Além disso, as mamães podem ter acesso a informações e disponibilização de métodos de planejamento familiar, consultas e atividades educativas.

Temos que aproveitar o momento e o investimento do Governo Federal! Para isso precisamos de pessoas engajadas que levem esse projeto a frente para que da estratégia Rede Cegonha seja implementada no seu município. Vamos fazer a nossa parte para que esta mudança aconteça!

Para maiores informações de como elaborar propostas para rede cegonha clique aqui.

Clique aqui e leia um lindo cordel da Rede Cegonha. Vale a pena!

Publicado no Blog da Gisele

Learnings and challenges in CambodiaAprendizados e desafios em Camboja

I went through the incredible temples of Angkor and the countryside. Cambodia is a country where cultures and traditions still very alive. At the same time it has a sad story of profound suffering, with the Khmer Rouge regime, where about two million people were killed.

I volunteered in the organization Women’s Health Cambodia. It is a non-profit NGO, based in the province of Takeo. The organization began to bring kindness to women. The focus is children and women’s health, but also includes the whole community.

Childbirth in Cambodia is not just the moment of birth, but the whole process of pregnancy, birth and postpartum recovery. Many women are cared by traditional birth atenders “chmâp boran”. The delivery is undergoing a process of hospitalization, but the conditions still very poor. Maternal mortality is estimated to be 250 per 100,000 live births.

In villages that I did volunteer work, the births took place at the health center. Women would walk around quietly during labor, the family was around. I would massage the mother’s back, but that close contact is not common for them. During birth no family member were allowed. The woman has the baby lying on her back and the cord is cut immediately after delivery. The midwife was not very gentle with the mothers, who are afraid to express themselves.

I learned a lot with postpartum visits at the families’ houses. All the neighbors gathered, curious to know what was happening. Traditional houses are made of palm leaves covering around the house and on the roof, wood is the support of the house. We would check mother and baby, but also see the entire family context. Where do they live? Do they have enough food? Do they have support?

Cambodians believe that the female body becomes cold after childbirth. They have different ways to warm the body, even if the weather is very hot. A woman shouldn’t bathe for a few days to a week after childbirth; should keep the body covered from head to toes; eat foods that warm the body, about 90% of families make “ang pleong” or rosting, which is a fire under the bamboo beds where women and babies lie, which sometimes extends for 10 days, to prevent back pain in the future and improve the skin. The postpartum rituals serve to prevent what they call “Tos” short and long term postpartum problems.

Camboja

They do not question about breastfeeding. I also didn’t see any baby with pacifier or diaper! He is covered by a piece of cloth, gloves and a mosquito net. They use the “Tiger Balm” cream in the belly of babies that is covered with a plastic that warms the tummy and also irritates it. In every house we found a knife located behind the baby’s head, which serves to protect him from evil spirits. Also is not nice to praise children because they believe it attracts evil spirits.

Camboja

We live such a different life. Many things for us would apparently be so necessary, but for them would not make much difference. It is a challenge to work in a way that you help without interfering too much.

Kindness – that’s what they really need and is the heart of the organization. A sincere smile, holding the hand of women during childbirth, massage her back. So the wound can be healed little by little and people can trust and love each other.

Camboja

First Published at Gisele’s BlogPassei pelos incríveis templos de Angkor e pelas vilas no interior do país. Camboja é um país onde as culturas e tradições ainda encontram-se muito vivas. Ao mesmo tempo, possui uma história triste de profundo sofrimento, com o regime do Khmer Vermelho, no qual cerca de dois milhões de pessoas foram mortas.

Fiz um trabalho voluntário com a organização Women’s Health Cambodia (Saúde da Mulher Camboja). É uma ONG sem fins lucrativos, com sede na província de Takeo. O projeto começou para trazer Bondade para as mulheres. O foco é a saúde de mulheres e crianças, mas também abrange toda a comunidade.

O Parto no Camboja não significa apenas o momento do nascimento, mas todo o processo de gravidez, parto e recuperação pós-parto. Muitas mulheres são cuidadas pelas parteiras tradicionais “chmâp boran”. O parto está passando por um processo de hospitalização, mas as condições ainda são muito precárias. A mortalidade materna é de 250 por 100.000 nascidos vivos.

Nas vilas que fiz trabalho voluntário, os partos aconteciam na unidade básica de saúde (UBS). Acompanhei alguns partos, as mulheres ficavam caminhando silenciosamente pela UBS durante o trabalho de parto, a família estava toda ao redor. Eu massageava as costas da gestante, mas esse contato mais próximo não é comum para eles. Na hora do parto ninguém podia estar junto. A mulher tem o bebê deitada na maca de parto. O cordão é cortado logo após o parto e são realizados os procedimentos com o bebê para depois voltar para a mãe. A parteira da unidade não era carinhosa com a mulher, que têm medo de se expressar. As pessoas no geral são mais frias umas com as outras, o que tem a ver com o recente regime do Khmer Vermelho.

Aprendi muito com as visitas pós-parto nas casas das mulheres. Chegávamos para a visita e todos vizinhos se juntavam, curiosos para saber o que estava acontecendo. As casas tradicionais são feitas de folhas de palmeira que cobrem o redor da casa e o telhado, a madeira é o suporte da casa. Nas visitas se avaliam mãe, bebê e todo o contexto familiar. Onde vivem? Será que têm comida suficiente? Será que têm apoio?

Cambojanos acreditam que o corpo da mulher torna-se frio após o parto. Eles têm formas diferentes para aquecer o corpo, mesmo que a temperatura esteja quente. Uma mulher não deveria tomar banho por alguns dias até uma semana após o parto; deve manter o corpo coberto da cabeça aos pés; consumir alimentos que aqueçam o corpo; cerca de 90% das famílias fazem o “ang pleong” ou rosting, que é uma fogueira embaixo do estrado de bambu onde as mulheres e bebês deitam e ficam “assando”, procedimento que às vezes se estende por 10 dias, para prevenir dor nas costas no futuro e melhorar a pele. Os rituais pós-parto servem para prevenir o que eles chamam de “Tos”, que são problemas a curto e longo prazo.

Camboja

As mulheres nem questionam amamentar ou não.Também não vi nenhum bebê com chupeta ou fralda! Ficam peladinhos, cobertos por um pedaço de pano, luvas e um mosquiteiro. Eles utilizam o creme “Tiger Balm” na barriga dos bebês e depois cobrem com um plástico. Isto serve para aquecer a barriga do bebê e prevenir diarréia, mas acaba irritando a pele. Em todas as casas encontramos uma faca localizada atrás da cabeça do bebê, que serve para protegê-lo contra os espíritos do mal. Também não é bom elogiar as crianças, pois eles acreditam que atrai espíritos do mal.

Camboja

Nós vivemos uma vida tão diferente. Muitas coisas que para nós seriam aparentemente tão necessárias, mas para eles não faz muita diferença. É um desafio trabalhar de uma maneira que você auxilie sem interferir muito.

Bondade – é o que eles realmente precisam e é o coração da organização. Um sorriso sincero, segurar a mão das mulheres durante o parto, massagear suas costas ou dar-lhe um abraço de coração. Para que a ferida seja pouco a pouco cicatrizada e as pessoas voltem a confiar e amar umas as outras.

Camboja

Publicado no Blog da Gisele

Gentle Birth MarchMarcha pelo Parto Humanizado

Published Agust 3rd Publicado no dia 3 de agosto no Blog da Gisele , escrito por Mayra Calvette

8053_362886363779607_2088760198_n

Gentle Birth: This is the way!

Birth is often seen as a complex medical procedure, in which woman and baby are often subject to routines and procedures imposed by the hospital, which are often unnecessary and harmful.

Fortunately, more and more women are realizing about the “Obstetric Matrix ” that they are inserted into and they are doing informed choices. These choices often are not the common pattern of the society, but which are best for this woman, baby and family. Many choose for a home birth, to be cared by doulas, midwives and obstetric nurses. And unlike what most people think, those are choices that are in accordance with the current scientific research.

In July Regional Council of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro (CREMERJ) published the resolutions nº 265/2012 and 266/2012 which prohibits the involvement of obstetricians in home births and the presence of doulas and midwives in hospital births. These resolutions disregard the most current scientific evidence, the recommendations of WHO and the Ministry of Health. Furthermore, these resolutions do not respect the right of freedom of choice of women, families and from the professionals themselves.

The recommendation of the systematic review of the Cochrane Library (which includes the most current scientific research in health) is that should be offered a model of care promoted by midwives to most women and they should be encouraged to claim this option. In the evaluation of the Cochrane systematic review was concluded that hospitals should implement continuous support intrapartum, integrating doulas in maternity services, since the best maternal and neonatal outcomes are obtained when the continuous intrapartum support is offered by doulas.

I traveled through several countries, meeting different cultures and birth models that work. I realized that the most socially developed countries tend to offer a humane and woman-centered care. Pregnant women have the right to choose their companions during childbirth, are encouraged to have a doula and a birth plan; have the same room for labour, birth and post partum; are part of the of the decision process making and can deny any procedure with her and her baby; have freedom of movement and can choose the position they want have their babies.

The care during labor and birth for low-risk pregnancies is based on obstetrics nurse and midwife and they have the work in a cooperation model of care with obstetricians. Some of these countries I visited, where they are the major care during low risk pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum are: England, Germany, Holland, Austria, Sweden and New Zealand. And all of these countries have excellent rates of maternal and neonatal mortality and cesarean rates much lower than Brazil (2008 data): 24%, 27.8%, 14%, 27%, 17%, 20%, respectively. While in Brazil the rates are 52% of c-sections, 82% in the private sector, the highest rates of c-sections in the world and 25% of women experience violence in obstetric hospitals!

Fortunately the CREMERJ resolutions were suspended on July 30 until the final decision. On Sunday, August 05 will happen a March for the Humanization of Childbirth in some Brazilian cities, including Rio de Janeiro. I invite everyone to participate, I’ll be there at Ipanema beach, at 2 pm!
Let’s move forward Brazil!

folder dentro A4-2
Published on August 3rd at Gisele’s Blog , escrito por Mayra Calvette

8053_362886363779607_2088760198_n

Parto Humanizado: esse é o caminho!

O nascimento é encarado como um complexo procedimento médico, em que mulher e bebê, frequentemente, são submetidos às rotinas e procedimentos impostos no hospital, que são muitas vezes desnecessários e prejudiciais.

Felizmente, cada vez mais as mulheres estão se conscientizando dessa “Matrix Obstétrica” que estão inseridas e estão fazendo escolhas baseadas em informação. Escolhas essas que muitas vezes saem do padrão comum da sociedade, mas que são as melhores para essa mulher, bebê e família. Muitas querem um parto domiciliar, um acompanhamento de doulas, de enfermeiras obstetras e obstetrizes. E ao contrário que muita gente pensa, são escolhas que estão de acordo com as mais atuais evidências científicas.

Quem está por dentro das notícias deve estar sabendo das resoluções nº 265/2012 e 266/2012 do Conselho Regional de Medicina do Rio de Janeiro (CREMERJ) publicadas no dia 19 de julho, que veta a participação de médicos obstetras em partos em casa e proíbe a presença de doulas, obstetrizes e parteiras em partos hospitalares. Essas resoluções desconsideram as mais atuais evidências científicas, as recomendações da OMS e do Ministério da Saúde. Além disso, essas resoluções desrespeitam o direito da liberdade de escolha das mulheres, famílias e dos próprios profissionais.

A recomendação da revisão sistemática da Biblioteca Cochrane (que reúne as mais atuais pesquisas científicas em saúde) é que se deve oferecer um modelo de atenção promovido por obstetrizes à maioria das mulheres e que elas deveriam ser encorajadas a reivindicar essa opção. Na avaliação da revisão sistemática da Cochrane sobre doulas foi concluído que todos os hospitais deveriam implementar programas para oferecer suporte contínuo intraparto, integrando doulas nos serviços de maternidade, uma vez que os melhores desfechos maternos e neonatais são obtidos quando o suporte contínuo intraparto é oferecido por doulas.

Viajei por diversos países, conhecendo diferentes culturas e modelos de parto que funcionam. Percebi que a maioria dos países socialmente desenvolvidos tendem a oferecer um cuidado humanizado e centrado na mulher. As gestantes têm o direito de escolher seus acompanhantes durante o parto; são encorajadas a terem uma doula e um plano de parto; ficam no mesmo quarto durante o trabalho de parto, parto e pós parto imediato; fazem parte do processo de tomada de decisão e podem negar qualquer procedimento para ela e seu bebê; têm liberdade de movimento e de escolher a posição que querem ter seus bebês.

O cuidado durante o trabalho de parto e parto para gestações de baixo risco é baseado na enfermeira obstetra e na obstetriz, em um modelo de cooperação com o médico obstetra. Alguns desses países que visitei, onde elas são principais provedoras de cuidado durante a gestação, parto e pós parto (de baixo risco) são: Inglaterra, Alemanha, Holanda, Áustria, Suécia e Nova Zelândia. E todos possuem ótimos índices de mortalidade materna e neonatal e índices de cesariana muito mais baixos que o Brasil (dados de 2008): 24%, 27,8%, 14%,27%, 17%, 20% , respectivamente. Enquanto no Brasil temos 52% de cesarianas, sendo 82% no setor privado, os maiores índices de cesarianas do mundo e 25% das mulheres sofrem violência obstétrica nos hospitais!

Felizmente, foram tomadas as providencias necessárias e as resoluções do CREMERJ foram suspensas no dia 30 de julho, até a decisão final. No domingo, dia 05 de agosto, acontecerá uma marcha pela Humanização do Parto em algumas cidades brasileiras, sendo a concentração maior no Rio de Janeiro. Convido todos a participarem, eu estarei lá em Ipanema, posto 9, às 14h.
Estamos no caminho, Brasil!

folder dentro A4-2

526382_364600560274854_1729003995_n
557223_364600640274846_504124187_n
428850_364600720274838_436301454_n
484094_364600806941496_985733916_n
313205_364600860274824_463863764_n
561409_364600946941482_288844061_n
524470_364601043608139_1374446917_n
482126_364601110274799_1047319231_n
304791_364601200274790_1911256560_n
217920_364601343608109_570511493_n
181160_364601446941432_641569649_n
427251_364601513608092_922500492_n

Birth in the “Roof of the World”O nascer no “Teto do Mundo”

Published at Gisele’s Blog By Mayra Calvette

DSC00169

After a wonderful flight by the Himalayan Mountains, passing by Mount Everest, we reach the “roof of the world”, Tibet. The wind was cold and biting! But we had a warm welcome from our guide. She gave us a super smile and a white scarf , called Kata, for good luck.

The Tibetan culture is rich, full of meanings, beliefs, rituals and traditions. Mantras, prayer wheels, prayer around the temples, receiving blessing from monks or lamas, butter tea. It’s a way to stay connected to spiritual life and give continuity of Tibetan culture,

The birth is part of the natural cycle of life. The belief in reincarnation is closely related to this moment. Be born as a human being is a sign of good luck. It is believed that is good that the woman purifies herself and be open to conceive, the kind of baby that the mother will attract depends on her karmic state, so the spirit will be attracted by the energies of the parents. The pregnant woman is at a special moment of her life, with access to higher dimensions, her dreams have special meanings. During labor there are rituals for the delivery is quick and easy. Sometimes the mother eats butter blessed by Lama to facilitate their delivery and provide energy.

The home delivery is common in Tibet, especially in rural areas. But in the local market in Lhasa, I spoke with several women and found that many of them had their babies at home with the help of a more experienced woman. The cost of the hospital is very high for their life standard, they also feel more comfortable at home and traditions are respected. I had the opportunity to interview the mother of our guide and meet her baby girl of four months old. They received with the famous butter tea.

DSC00189

They lived in the rice fields before moving to Lhasa. She had eight children, all born at home, and in seven of them she was alone. She also helped other women during childbirth. She said that more experienced women help each other, but there are no midwives. She said that after the first one she already knew how to do and also they came very fast and easy. She continued to do her chores at home and in the rice fields. When the contractions became stronger she went home and the baby was born. For all babies she was standing with knees bent and leaning way forward. Women wear long skirts. As she was alone at seven birth, she used to raise the front of the skirt and hold the rear. The baby fell on that net. She cut the umbilical cord after the delivery of the placenta, which felt off soon after birth. After delivery, women drink butter tea to soothe and warm the body. Keep the woman warm during labor, birth and postpartum is essential.

They wrap the baby in used clothes from the parents, because is more comfortable. The placenta is buried or thrown into the river. The process of burying the placenta, shows respect for that organ that has nourished the baby inside the womb. It is buried in “white” place, far away where other animals cannot eat. The cord is often kept to protect the baby from evil spirits. The whole neighborhood knows that the baby is born. But the ceremony begins on the third day of life for boy and forth day if it’s a girl.

Many parents take their baby to be blessed and receive the name of the Lama. So he will have a greater connection with the whole during his life on earth.

Unfortunately, the Tibetan culture is getting lost over the years. Tibet is part of Chinese territory. We could see clearly the Chinese repression there, especially Lhasa, where we were. All outdoors are written in Chinese and Tibetan with smaller letters. At school, the language and vocabulary taught is the Chinese. The children only speak Tibetan if parents speak at home. The temples of Lhasa are turning into museum. The new generation is much more fascinated by the temptations of the modern world than in keeping the ancient traditions.

With the birth would be no different. Many of the women in town have their babies in the Chinese hospital. The preference for vaginal delivery is almost general. Our guide had a four months old baby. She had a normal delivery at the hospital. She confessed that was not a very good experience for her. The professionals were not kind and she could not have any companion during labor and delivery. She had her baby in the gynecological position (lying down with legs up). And had her perineum cut by an episiotomy that left her unable to walk straight for a month.

In the reality I have known, Tibetans live in two extremes: cold, mechanized and often traumatic hospital birth, but that brings more security; and traditional birth at home, more cozy, that respects the nature of childbirth and the Tibetan traditions, but that brings its risks for the lack of basic safety precautions and hygiene.

“We can only conclude that there must be something seriously wrong with our progress and development, and if we do not check it in time there could be disastrous consequences for the future of humanity.” Dalai Lama

DSC00127Publicado no Blog da Gisele por Mayra Calvette

DSC00169

Após um vôo maravilhoso pela Cordilheira do Himalaia, passando pelo Monte Everest, chegamos ao “teto do mundo”, o Tibete. O vento estava frio e cortante! Mas tivemos uma recepção calorosa da nossa guia. Ela nos recepcionou sorridente e ganhamos um cachecol branco, chamado Kata, para dar boa sorte.

A cultura Tibetana é riquíssima, repleta de significados, crenças, rituais e tradições. Mantras, rodas de oração, rezas ao redor dos templos, recebimento de benção dos monges ou lamas, chá de manteiga. É uma forma de manter-se conectado a vida espiritual e dar continuidade a cultura tibetana,

O nascimento faz parte do ciclo natural da vida. A crença na reencarnação está intimamente relacionada a esse momento. Nascer como um ser humano é sinal de boa sorte. A mulher deve estar purificada e aberta para conceber. O tipo de bebê que a mãe vai atrair depende de seu estado kármico, sendo o espírito a ser encarnado atraído pelas energias dos pais. A mulher grávida está em um momento especial de sua vida, com acesso a dimensões superiores e seus sonhos possuem significados especiais. Existem rituais com o propósito de tornar o trabalho de parto mais rápido e fácil. Algumas vezes a mãe come manteiga abençoada pelo Lama para facilitar seu parto e dar energia.

O parto em casa é comum no Tibete, principalmente nas áreas rurais. No comércio local de Lhasa, conversei com várias mulheres e descobri que muitas delas tiveram seus bebês em casa, com a ajuda de uma mulher mais experiente. O custo do hospital é muito alto para seu padrão vida, elas sentem-se mais a vontade em casa, além das tradições serem respeitadas. Tive a oportunidade de entrevistar a mãe da nossa guia e conhecer sua filha de quatro meses. Recepcionaram-nos com o famoso chá de manteiga, feito com o leite de Iaque.

DSC00189

Eles moravam nos campos de arroz antes de mudarem-se para Lhasa. Ela teve oito filhos, todos nascidos em casa, sendo que em sete deles ela estava sozinha. Ela também ajudou outras mulheres durante o parto. Falou que as mulheres mais experientes ajudam as outras, mas não existiam parteiras. Depois do seu primeiro parto, já sabia como fazer e também teve partos fáceis e rápidos. Ela continuava a com seus afazeres de casa e nas plantações de arroz, quando as contrações ficavam mais fortes ia para casa e quando sentia vontade de ir ao banheiro, sabia que o bebê estava chegando. No nascimento de todos os bebês, ela estava em pé, com os joelhos levemente dobrados e inclinada para frente. As mulheres usam saias compridas, como ela estava sozinha em sete de seus partos, ela levantava a parte da frente da saia e segurava a parte de trás. O bebê caía nessa rede. Ela fazia o corte do cordão umbilical após a saída da placenta, que é desquitada rapidamente. Depois do parto as mulheres tomam chá de manteiga que é bom para acalmar, nutrir e esquentar o corpo. Manter a mulher aquecida durante o trabalho de parto, parto e pós parto é essencial.

O bebê era enrolado em uma roupa mais usada dos pais, por ser mais confortável. A placenta é enterrada ou jogada no rio. O processo de enterrar a placenta mostra o respeito por esse órgão que nutriu o bebê dentro do útero. Ela é enterrada em um lugar mais afastado onde outros animais não comam. O cordão muitas vezes é guardado para proteger o bebê de espíritos ruins. Toda a vizinhança sabe que o bebê nasceu. Mas a cerimônia se inicia no terceiro dia de vida para o menino e no quarto dia para a menina.

Muitos pais levam o seu bebê para ser abençoado e receber o nome pelo Lama. Dessa forma, ele terá uma conexão maior com o mundo espiritual durante sua vida na terra.

Infelizmente, a cultura tibetana vem se perdendo com o passar dos anos. Tibete faz parte do território chinês. Sentimos por todos os cantos a repressão, especialmente em Lhasa, onde estávamos. Todas as placas são escritas em chinês e em tibetano com letras menores. Na própria escola, o idioma ensinado é o chinês. Os templos de Lhasa estão virando museus. A nova geração está muito mais fascinada pelas tentações do mundo moderno do que em manter as tradições milenares.

Com o parto não seria diferente. Muitas das mulheres da cidade têm seus bebês no hospital chinês. A preferência pelo parto normal é praticamente geral. A nossa guia teve parto normal no hospital, pensando que seria melhor por ter mais tecnologia. Mas confessou que não foi uma experiência muito boa. Os profissionais não eram gentis, falavam para ela não gemer e ela não podia ter nenhum acompanhante durante o trabalho de parto e parto. Ela teve seu bebê na posição ginecológica (deitada, com as pernas para cima) e seu períneo cortado, o que a deixou sem conseguir caminhar direito por um mês. Ela pensa em ter o próximo filho com a ajuda de sua mãe, em casa, como ocorreu com suas irmãs e cunhadas.

Na realidade que conheci, os tibetanos vivem em dois extremos: o parto hospitalar frio, mecanizado e muitas vezes traumático, mas que traz mais segurança; e o parto em casa tradicional, mais aconchegante, que respeita a natureza do parto e as tradições tibetanas, mas que traz seus riscos pela falta de cuidados básicos de segurança e higiene.

“Só podemos concluir que deve haver algo muito errado com o nosso progresso e desenvolvimento. Se não verificarmos a tempo, poderão haver conseqüências desastrosas para o futuro da humanidade.” Dalai Lama

DSC00127

Home Birth MarchMarcha do Parto em Casa

First published at Gisele’s Blog, written by Mayra Calvette

Gisele Bündchen e Mayra Calvette

June was historic for the Humanization of Childbirth in Brazil.

One of the most popular TV program from Brazil, Fantástico, had a report about home birth on the 10th June. It showed a beautiful home birth video, with a midwife, two doulas and a neonatologist accompaniment.

The obstetrician Dr. Jorge Kuhn, spoke respectfully in favor of home birth as an option for low risk pregnancies. On the following Monday, the Regional Medicine Council of Rio de Janeiro – CREMERJ – opened a complaint against the doctor.

The movement for birth humanization in Brazil has grown in geometric progression. Every day many adherents. Every day more women empowered and sharing their experience. The complaint of this doctor, an advocate for a gentle birth, was the push for a great movement. The news quickly spread throughout Brazil, mainly through social networks.

Within a week thousands of people were organized in several cities of Brazil, to make the first Home Birth March. At the end of next week, June 16 and 17, around 5000 people in over 30 cities in Brazil were part of this revolution. Only in Sao Paulo were in 1500 women, parents, children and professionals marching for the rights of choice and freedom!

I shivered to see the strength of the movement and how quickly it spread. This is the advantage of being connected by an ideal and with the help of social media.

This march was similar with what happened in some other countries, 30 years ago in England and 20 years ago in New Zealand. Now it’s Brazil’s time!

Gisele Bündchen e Mayra Calvette

This was a march for the freedom of choice and respect for women and babies during birth. Women have the right to choose how and where they want to give birth, with correct information, respect and appropriate orientations. A march for women who have low-risk pregnancies and want home birth are not seen as inconsequential and people who put their lives and their babies lives at risk. For doctors, nurses, obstetricians, midwives and doulas who support these women not to be seen and treated as outcasts.

The safety of home birth should no longer be under discussion, since many studies show it’s safe for low risk pregnancies, accompanied by qualified professional and a referral hospital. No wonder that in some developed countries this is an option that is part of the health system.

We want to clarify that we don’t want to convince anybody to have a homebirth, we want to show one more option. If you have any kind of fear, of uncertainty, if you have any disease, if your prenatal indicate any problem – the best place to have your baby is at the hospital.

We are not protesting against the hospital birth. We are protesting against the violence during childbirth, whether emotional or physical. A study in Brazil showed that 25% of Brazilian women suffer some kind of violence during childbirth. We want women to be respected, to receive a loving care wherever they choose to have their baby – at home, in the hospital or birth center.

Respect for Birth is respect for woman and baby!

May we one day ensure that all women have the rights for a gentle, respectful and private birth, without suffering and no damage to their body and their baby, wherever they wish to birth them.

“Never doubt that a small group of aware and engaged people can change the world.” Margaret Mead

Special Video from the Home Birth March
[tubepress video=’y2jh6CHWuAY’ theme=’youtube’ descriptionLimit=’0′]Publicado primeiramente no Blog da Gisele Bündchen, escrito por Mayra Calvette.

Gisele Bündchen e Mayra Calvette

Junho foi um mês histórico para a Humanização do Parto no Brasil. O programa dominical de televisão “Fantástico” mostrou uma reportagem sobre a polêmica do parto em casa no dia 10 de junho. Apareceu o vídeo belíssimo de um parto em casa com o acompanhamento de uma obstetriz, duas doulas e neonatologista.

O médico obstetra Dr. Jorge Kuhn apareceu na reportagem falando respeitosamente a favor do parto domiciliar para gestações de baixo risco. Na segunda-feira seguinte, o Conselho Regional de Medicina do Rio de Janeiro (CREMERJ), informou que enviaria uma denúncia contra o medico no CRM de São Paulo.

O movimento pela humanização do parto no Brasil tem crescido em progressão geométrica. Cada dia mais adeptos. Cada dia mais mulheres empoderadas e que compartilham suas experiências positivas de parto. A denúncia deste médico, defensor do parto humanizado, foi o impulso para que um grande movimento acontecesse. A notícia rapidamente se espalhou pelo Brasil afora através, principalmente, nas redes sociais.

Em uma semana, milhares de pessoas se organizaram em diversas cidades do Brasil, para fazer a primeira Marcha do Parto em Casa. Sim, uma semana! No final de semana seguinte, dias 16 e 17 de junho, cerca de 5000 pessoas em mais de 30 cidades, se reuniram para fazer parte dessa revolução. Só em São Paulo foram 1500 mulheres, pais, crianças e profissionais marchando pelo direito à escolha e à liberdade!

Arrepiei-me ao ver a força do movimento e a rapidez com que se espalhou. Essa é a vantagem de estarmos todos conectados por um ideal, com a ajuda das redes sociais.

Esse tipo de protesto também aconteceu em alguns outros países e foi possível a mudança de paradigma, há 30 anos. Inglaterra e Nova Zelândia são exemplos. Agora chegou a hora do Brasil!

Gisele Bündchen e Mayra Calvette

Essa foi uma marcha pela liberdade de escolha e pelo respeito à mulher e ao bebê durante o parto. As mulheres têm o direito de escolher como e onde querem parir, com informações corretas, respeito e orientações adequadas. Foi uma marcha para que as mulheres que têm gestações de baixo risco e desejam o parto domiciliar não sejam vistas como pessoas inconsequentes e que colocam a sua vida e de seus filhos em risco. Para que os médicos, enfermeiras, obstetras, obstetrizes e doulas que apoiam essas mulheres não sejam vistos e tratados como párias.

A segurança do parto domiciliar não deveria mais estar em discussão, uma vez que as pesquisas comprovam sua segurança para mulheres com gestação de baixo risco, acompanhadas por profissionais qualificados e com um hospital de referência. Em alguns países desenvolvidos essa é uma opção que faz parte do sistema de saúde.

Devemos esclarecer que não queremos convencer ninguém a fazer parto domiciliar, queremos mostrar que há mais uma opção. Se você tem algum tipo de dúvida, de medo, de incerteza; se você tem qualquer doença, se seu pré natal aponta qualquer problema – o melhor lugar para ter seu bebê é no hospital.

Não estamos protestando contra o parto hospitalar. Estamos protestando contra a violência durante o parto, seja ela emocional ou física. Uma pesquisa no Brasil mostrou que 25% das mulheres sofrem algum tipo de violência durante o parto. Queremos que as mulheres sejam respeitadas, que recebam um cuidado mais amoroso onde quer que ela escolha ter seu bebê – em casa, no hospital ou em casa de parto.

Respeito ao parto é respeito à mulher e ao bebê!

Que possamos um dia garantir que todas as mulheres tenham direito a um parto digno, respeitoso, privado, sem sofrimento e sem danos aos seus corpos e ao seu bebê, onde quer que elas desejem tê-los.

Vídeo especial da Marcha do Parto em Casa
[tubepress video=’y2jh6CHWuAY’ theme=’youtube’ descriptionLimit=’0′]

The Midwife as Status SymbolA Parteira como símbolo de Status

Article published at NY Times

“BESIDES being impossibly gorgeous mothers, what else do Christy Turlington, Karolina Kurkova and Gisele Bündchen have in common?

Each could probably afford to buy her own private wing at a hospital, but instead of going to a top-notch obstetrician, all chose a midwife to deliver their babies.

“When I met my midwife, her whole approach felt closer to home,” said Ms. Turlington, who delivered both her children — Grace, 9, and Finn, 6 — with a midwife at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital in New York, one with the help of an obstetrician because of complications. A former model, she founded Every Mother Counts, a nonprofit organization devoted to maternal health. “I knew I wanted a natural childbirth.”

Are midwives becoming trendy, like juice cleanses and Tom’s shoes? It seems that way, at least among certain well-dressed pockets of New York society, where midwifery is no longer seen as a weird, fringe practice favored by crunchy types, but as an enlightened, more natural choice for the famous and fashionable. “The perception of midwives has completely shifted,” said Dr. Jacques Moritz, director of the gynecology division at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt and a consulting obstetrician for three midwife practices. “It used to be just the hippies who wanted to go to midwives. Now it’s the women in the red-bottom shoes.”

And like any status symbol, a pecking order has emerged. Just as getting your toddler into the right preschool requires social maneuvering, getting into a boutique midwifery clinic has become competitive.

“We constantly have to turn women away,” said Sylvie Blaustein, the founder of Midwifery of Manhattan, a practice on West 58th Street that has its share of well-heeled clients. Opened in 2003, the practice now has six midwives on staff. “Because of the quality of care, we can only deliver about 20 babies a month.”

“It sounds bizarre,” Ms. Blaustein added, “but midwifery has become quote-unquote trendy.”

Like obstetricians, midwives are medically trained and licensed to deliver babies. The main practical difference is that only obstetricians can perform surgeries, including Caesarean sections, and oversee high-risk pregnancies. On the other hand, midwives tend to approach childbirth holistically, and more of them provide emotional as well as physical care. This can involve staying by a laboring mother’s side for 12 or more hours and making house calls.

Nevertheless, misconceptions remain. “There will always be people who have no idea what we do — they think we’re witches who perform séances and burn candles,” said Barbara Sellars, who runs CBS Midwifery, a small practice in Manhattan’s financial district. “Sure, some women want a hippie-dippy spiritual birth and I can’t guarantee that. I can guarantee the quality of care.”

Ms. Sellars is considered one of the more respected midwives in New York, and her patients have included opera singers, actresses, bankers and models like Ms. Turlington. (Disclosure: of the more than 1,850 babies that Ms. Sellars has delivered, my daughter was No. 1,727 and my son was No. 1,798.)

It was that high degree of care that led Kate Young, a stylist in New York, to seek out CBS Midwifery when she became pregnant with her son, Stellan, in 2008.

“My friends who had the best birth experiences all went to midwives,” said Ms. Young, whose clients have included Natalie Portman and Rachel Weisz. “When you go to a doctor, you’re left alone a lot. You don’t have someone sitting there, looking you in the eye, getting you through it. When I thought about what I wanted for my child and how I wanted to have my child, every sign pointed to going to a midwife.”

The rising popularity of midwifery among cosmopolitan women also coincides with larger cultural shifts toward all things natural, whether it’s organic foods, raw diets or homeopathic remedies.

“Pregnancy is not a disease, it’s a condition,” said Dr. Moritz, whose own children were delivered by midwives. “We need fewer OB’s and more midwives.”

For other women, midwives offer a sense of control. “This is a time when women are asking more questions, getting healthy, wanting to be more empowered,” said Ms. Kurkova, the 28-year-old model, who gave birth to her son, Tobin, in 2009. “I didn’t want a hospital to take away my power. I didn’t want to risk someone cutting me open and taking the baby out that way.”

While midwife deliveries typically take place in the hospital, Ms. Kurkova is among those who have given birth at home.

“A home birth is more relaxed,” said Miriam Schwarzschild, a home midwife for 25 years who lives in Brooklyn. “I wash my hands, listen to the baby’s heartbeat, take the mother’s vital signs and that’s it. There are no routines. You step outside the bureaucracy at home.”

A big selling point for midwives — both at home and in the hospital — is that, barring medical complications, the baby is not separated from the mother after the birth.

Another at-home advocate is Ms. Bündchen, who gave birth in 2010 to her son, Benjamin, in her Boston penthouse.

“We say Gisele delivered her own baby but I was in attendance,” said Deborah Allen, a midwife in Cambridge, Mass., who, along with MAYRA CALVETTE, a Brazilian midwife, was present at the birth. “Obviously, privacy is of the utmost importance. You are completely exposed. You need to be in a place where you feel comfortable to do that. Gisele was extremely prepared.”

But not everyone is ready to go that route.

When Esther Haynes, deputy editor at Lucky Magazine, decided to go to a midwife, she quickly rejected an at-home birth. “This is New York, and if there was an emergency, I didn’t want my story being, ‘I called 911 and the ambulance took 45 minutes because of traffic!’ ” Ms. Haynes said.”

“Also my apartment is kind of cluttered,” she added. “I hated the thought of going into labor thinking, I wish I’d thrown out more magazines.”

Thanks DANIELLE PERGAMENT and NY Times for the wonderful Article!

Article published at NY Times

“BESIDES being impossibly gorgeous mothers, what else do Christy Turlington, Karolina Kurkova and Gisele Bündchen have in common?

Each could probably afford to buy her own private wing at a hospital, but instead of going to a top-notch obstetrician, all chose a midwife to deliver their babies.

“When I met my midwife, her whole approach felt closer to home,” said Ms. Turlington, who delivered both her children — Grace, 9, and Finn, 6 — with a midwife at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital in New York, one with the help of an obstetrician because of complications. A former model, she founded Every Mother Counts, a nonprofit organization devoted to maternal health. “I knew I wanted a natural childbirth.”

Are midwives becoming trendy, like juice cleanses and Tom’s shoes? It seems that way, at least among certain well-dressed pockets of New York society, where midwifery is no longer seen as a weird, fringe practice favored by crunchy types, but as an enlightened, more natural choice for the famous and fashionable. “The perception of midwives has completely shifted,” said Dr. Jacques Moritz, director of the gynecology division at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt and a consulting obstetrician for three midwife practices. “It used to be just the hippies who wanted to go to midwives. Now it’s the women in the red-bottom shoes.”

And like any status symbol, a pecking order has emerged. Just as getting your toddler into the right preschool requires social maneuvering, getting into a boutique midwifery clinic has become competitive.

“We constantly have to turn women away,” said Sylvie Blaustein, the founder of Midwifery of Manhattan, a practice on West 58th Street that has its share of well-heeled clients. Opened in 2003, the practice now has six midwives on staff. “Because of the quality of care, we can only deliver about 20 babies a month.”

“It sounds bizarre,” Ms. Blaustein added, “but midwifery has become quote-unquote trendy.”

Like obstetricians, midwives are medically trained and licensed to deliver babies. The main practical difference is that only obstetricians can perform surgeries, including Caesarean sections, and oversee high-risk pregnancies. On the other hand, midwives tend to approach childbirth holistically, and more of them provide emotional as well as physical care. This can involve staying by a laboring mother’s side for 12 or more hours and making house calls.

Nevertheless, misconceptions remain. “There will always be people who have no idea what we do — they think we’re witches who perform séances and burn candles,” said Barbara Sellars, who runs CBS Midwifery, a small practice in Manhattan’s financial district. “Sure, some women want a hippie-dippy spiritual birth and I can’t guarantee that. I can guarantee the quality of care.”

Ms. Sellars is considered one of the more respected midwives in New York, and her patients have included opera singers, actresses, bankers and models like Ms. Turlington. (Disclosure: of the more than 1,850 babies that Ms. Sellars has delivered, my daughter was No. 1,727 and my son was No. 1,798.)

It was that high degree of care that led Kate Young, a stylist in New York, to seek out CBS Midwifery when she became pregnant with her son, Stellan, in 2008.

“My friends who had the best birth experiences all went to midwives,” said Ms. Young, whose clients have included Natalie Portman and Rachel Weisz. “When you go to a doctor, you’re left alone a lot. You don’t have someone sitting there, looking you in the eye, getting you through it. When I thought about what I wanted for my child and how I wanted to have my child, every sign pointed to going to a midwife.”

The rising popularity of midwifery among cosmopolitan women also coincides with larger cultural shifts toward all things natural, whether it’s organic foods, raw diets or homeopathic remedies.

“Pregnancy is not a disease, it’s a condition,” said Dr. Moritz, whose own children were delivered by midwives. “We need fewer OB’s and more midwives.”

For other women, midwives offer a sense of control. “This is a time when women are asking more questions, getting healthy, wanting to be more empowered,” said Ms. Kurkova, the 28-year-old model, who gave birth to her son, Tobin, in 2009. “I didn’t want a hospital to take away my power. I didn’t want to risk someone cutting me open and taking the baby out that way.”

While midwife deliveries typically take place in the hospital, Ms. Kurkova is among those who have given birth at home.

“A home birth is more relaxed,” said Miriam Schwarzschild, a home midwife for 25 years who lives in Brooklyn. “I wash my hands, listen to the baby’s heartbeat, take the mother’s vital signs and that’s it. There are no routines. You step outside the bureaucracy at home.”

A big selling point for midwives — both at home and in the hospital — is that, barring medical complications, the baby is not separated from the mother after the birth.

Another at-home advocate is Ms. Bündchen, who gave birth in 2010 to her son, Benjamin, in her Boston penthouse.

“We say Gisele delivered her own baby but I was in attendance,” said Deborah Allen, a midwife in Cambridge, Mass., who, along with MAYRA CALVETTE, a Brazilian midwife, was present at the birth. “Obviously, privacy is of the utmost importance. You are completely exposed. You need to be in a place where you feel comfortable to do that. Gisele was extremely prepared.”

But not everyone is ready to go that route.

When Esther Haynes, deputy editor at Lucky Magazine, decided to go to a midwife, she quickly rejected an at-home birth. “This is New York, and if there was an emergency, I didn’t want my story being, ‘I called 911 and the ambulance took 45 minutes because of traffic!’ ” Ms. Haynes said.”

“Also my apartment is kind of cluttered,” she added. “I hated the thought of going into labor thinking, I wish I’d thrown out more magazines.”

Thanks DANIELLE PERGAMENT and NY Times for the wonderful Article!