The Transformation of a Maternity Service St George’s Hospital – SydneyA Transformação de uma Maternidade Hospital St George – Sydney

While in Sydney I went to visit the Birth Centre that is part of St George’s Hospital in Sydney. I interviewed one of the midwives, Jane McMurtrie, that is a midwife for 20 years and works at the Birth Centre for 10 years. She also showed me around the Birth Centre. She helped to implement the Caseload Model of Care that means Cotinuum Model of Care, they call it TANGO model. Jane said that this is a very satisfying model for the midwife and the woman and her family!

DSC04540

Most of woman in Australia receive care through a hospital-based system and give birth at the hospital. Australia has a public system called Medicare that is part of the taxes payed for the government, St George’s Hospital and the Caseload Model of Care is part of it.

DSC04546
DSC04549

The Maternity Service at St George’s Hospital was transformed from a traditional, medically dominated culture to one flexible, woman centered and with a continuity of midwifery care (1).

DSC04564

The process of transforming this maternity service came after a number of government reports showing that woman wanted more control and choice over their care during childbirth, including acess to midwifery continuity of care in the community (1).

In 1990 the hospital opened the Birth Centre in response to a government review that recommended such centres be stablished where woman could have natural childbirth and direct care from midwives. Birth Centre model were also seen as radical and against the status quo of the hospital system, and so were strongly resisted by some of the obstetrician who worked at the hospital (1).

The Birth Centre consists in two antenatal rooms and two birthing rooms with baths. Woman can choose to give birth at the birth centre or at home if everything is normal and they are healthy. The policy for home birth is more restricted then for the birth center. And if something is not going as expected the midwives often call to the obstetrician working in the shift to discuss the case (2).

DSC04585
DSC04580
DSC04587

When women first get pregnant they go see their general practicioner (GP) and get a referal to the hospital. At that stage they can choose to come to the birth Center, with the first appointment around 12-14 weeks of pregnancy (2).

DSC04592
DSC04600
DSC04602

She has a continuum of care during pregnancy, birth and after birth. They have 5 midwives in the moment, and have a lack of two midwives. They work in pairs, with 8 birth a month. They alternate the antenatal visits, so the woman get to know both midwives well and vise-versa. When the labor starts the woman is going to receive care of one of the two midwife she met that is on call on that day (2).

DSC04596

The woman is going to have a known midwife with her, doesn’t matter where she chooses to birth, either at home, birth centre, or if she needs to be trasnferred to the maternity ward or even if a c-section is necessary. The c-section rates at the Birth Center is less then 10%. And the woman accept it easier, because it wasn’t something against her will, she was envolved during the whole decision making. At a home birth there are always two midwives, but one of them get there when the birth is becoming more iminent or if the other midwife needs her. Woman often have a doula with them (2).

DSC04569

If the midwives need to transport a woman to the hospital during a home birth, they can call the hospital ambulance in case of emergency. But most of the times they transfer because of slow progress of labor and the woman and partner decide they want to go in the hospital, so they just go by car and the midwife cotinues the care at the hospital (2).

There is a policy in the hospital that just after birth the baby has to have a skin to skin contact with the mother. They try not to do too much on that first moments after birth, just if it necessary. They have a very physiological 3d stage (after the baby is Born) and this is because they don’t interfer like cutting the cord before stops pulsating or trying to get the placenta out. Then the mother goes to the bed with the baby and stay together and breastfeed… sometimes they even have a nap there with the father. After around 1-2 hours, when the baby is ready the midwife does the examinations, weigh, measure, put some clothes on. They don’t bath the baby for the first 24 hours after birth, so he can control his temperature better and doesn’t get cold.

DSC04594

It is recommended that all babies receive vitamin K injection (first hours after birth) and Hep B vaccine (in the first days), but the parents can decide if they want it or not. The baby eye drop was never part of the routine in the Hospital and in Australia (2). This eye drop is routine in maternities in Brazil, US and many other countries, it is silver nitrate or erythromycin to prevent a possible infection in the babies eyes (caused by gonorrhea or chlamydia), and it has been a big topic for discussion.

After birth woman can stay a minimum of 4 hours and up to 48 hours, depending of her needs. At a home birth she doesn’t have leave the house! They are visited at home by their known midwife until 2 weeks post partum, and the number of visits vary, depending of the woman and baby needs. After that she receives care of the early childhood nurses and with 6 weeks she has an appointment with her GP (2).

DSC04554

The St George’s caseload model of care was the first in New South Wales, but today there are many of them around NSW and Australia! Specially those in rural area, because it is actually very cost-efective and improve outcomes. They also have this caseload model for woman that chooses to give birth at the hospital or have a high risk pregnancy (2).

Jane also said in the interview:

DSC04598

“During prenatal I focus in normalize things and not worry too much. I try to help woman to feel confident, saying that they can do it! This is just how their bodies were designed for, and the way it works is just amazing!
The way you say something can change the way the woman approach things. I’ve heard a woman saying that at her first appointment with the obstetrician he said that she was too small and the husband too big, so they shoud think about having a c-section …. This is not going to make the woman confortable that she can give birth. It is not just a physical thing, it’s how you approach it. If you go into labor feeling very positive, you are more likely to have a natural birth.
Birth is so different, but in the same time is the same… and it transforms people, it is a miracle! “ .

DSC04571

DSC04593

1- Brodie, Pat and Homer, Caroline. 2009. “Transforming the culture of a Marternity Service.” In Birth Models That Work, eds. Robbie Davis-Floyd, Lesley Barclay, Betty-Anne Daviss, and Jan Tritten. Berkeley: University of California Press, pp. 187-212.
2- McMurtrie, Jane. Calvette, Mayra. Parto pelo Mundo/ Birth Around the World. Sydney, Australia. December, 2011.
Enquanto estava na Austrália tive a oportunidade de conhecer o Centro de Parto Normal (CPN), que faz parte do Hospital St George em Sydney. Fui recebida com muito carinho por uma das parteiras, Jane McMurtrie, que exerce a profissão há 20 anos e trabalha lá há 10 anos. Jane me mostrou o CPN e ela falou como funciona esse lindo modelo de assistência ao parto. Ela ajudou a implementar o Modelo de cuidado continuado, que eles chamam de modelo TANGO. Jane disse que este é um modelo muito gratificante para a parteira , mulher e sua família!

DSC04540

A maioria das mulheres na Austrália recebem cuidados através de um sistema hospitalar e dão à luz no hospital. A Austrália tem um sistema público chamado Medicare, que é mantido através dos impostos pagos para o governo. O modelo continuado de cuidado do Hospital St George é parte desse sistema público.

DSC04546
DSC04549

A Maternidade do Hospital St George foi transformada de uma cultura medicalizada e intervencionista para uma flexível, centrada na mulher e com continuidade de cuidado pela parteira profissional (midwife) (1).

DSC04564

O processo de transformar este serviço veio após uma série de relatórios do governo mostrando que a mulher queria mais controle e escolha sobre seus cuidados durante o parto, incluindo acesso à continuidade de cuidados na comunidade (1).

Em 1990, o hospital abriu o CPN em resposta a uma revisão do governo que recomenda que tais centros sejam estabelecidos onde a mulher poderia ter parto natural e cuidado direto de parteiras. O Modelo de CPN era visto como radical e contra o status quo do sistema hospitalar, por isso foi fortemente combatidos por alguns obstetras que trabalhavam no hospital (1).

O CPN consiste em duas salas de pré-natal e duas salas de parto com banheira. A mulher pode optar por dar à luz no CPN ou em casa, se a gravidez é de baixo risco e a mulher saudável. O protocolo para o parto em casa é um pouco mais restrito do que para o parto no CPN. E se algo não está indo como esperado as parteiras podem ligar para o obstetra de plantão para discutir o caso (2).

DSC04580
DSC04585
DSC04587

Quando a mulher acaba de descobrir que está grávida, ela consulta o médico clínico geral e obtêm uma referência para o hospital. Nessa fase, elas podem optar por vir para o Centro de Parto Normal, sendo a primeira consulta em torno de 12-14 semanas de gravidez (2).

DSC04592
DSC04600
DSC04602

A mulher tem uma continuidade de cuidado durante a gravidez, parto e após o parto. O CPN está com cinco parteiras no momento, tendo duas parteiras em falta. As parteiras profissionais trabalham em pares, com oito nascimento por mês. Elas alternam as visitas pré-natais, assim a mulher pode conhecer as duas parteiras e vice-versa. Quando o trabalho de parto inicia, a gestante recebe atendimento de uma das duas parteiras que ela conheceu e que está de plantão nesse dia (2).

DSC04596

A mulher vai ter uma parteira conhecida com ela , não importa onde ela escolheu parir, seja em casa ou no CPN. Se ela precisa ser transferida pra maternidade ou mesmo ter uma cesárea. O índice de cesáreas no CPN é menos de 10%. E a mulher aceita mais, porque não era algo contra a vontade dela, ela estava envolvida durante a toda tomada de decisão. Em um parto em casa há sempre duas parteiras, mas um delas chega quando o nascimento está eminente ou se a parteira sente necessidade de ter outra parteira. Muitas vezes uma doula também está presente (2).

DSC04569

Se as parteiras sentem necessidade de transportar uma mulher para o hospital durante um parto em casa, elas podem chamar a ambulância do hospital em caso de emergência. Mas na maioria das vezes eles transferem por causa do lento progresso do trabalho de parto e a mulher e marido decidem ir para o hospital, então eles simplesmente vão de carro e a parteira continua o cuidado no hospital (2).

Logo após o nascimento, o bebê é colocado em contato pele a pele com a mãe. É respeitado todo o ritmo fisiológico da mãe e do bebê. Geralmente o terceiro estágio (após o nascimento do bebê) é fisiológico e isso se deve ao fato das parteiras não interferem desnecessariamente, como retirar o bebê da mãe, cortar o cordão antes de parar de pulsar ou fazer tração na placenta para ela sair. Em seguida, a mãe geralmente vai para a cama com o bebê e eles ficam juntos e a amamentação acontece … às vezes eles ainda tiram um cochilo na cama com o pai. Depois de cerca de 1- 2 horas a parteira faz os exames, pesa, mede e coloca as roupinhas. Eles não dão banho no bebê nas primeiras 24 horas após o nascimento, para que ele não perca calor e consiga controlar melhor sua temperatura.

DSC04594

É recomendado que todos os bebês recebam a injeção de vitamina K (primeiras horas após o nascimento) e vacina para Hep B (no primeiro dia), mas os pais podem decidir se querem ou não. O colírio bebê nunca foi parte da rotina neste Hospital e na Austrália (2). Este colírio (nitrato de prata ou eritromicina) é rotina no Brasil, EUA e em muitos outros países e é usado para evitar uma possível infecção nos olhos bebês (causadas por gonorréia ou clamídia), e tem sido um grande tópico de discussão sobre a real necessidade do seu uso rotineiro.

Após o nascimento a mulher pode ficar um mínimo de 4 horas e até 48 horas na maternidade, dependendo de suas necessidades. No parto em casa ela não precisa sair de casa! Eles são visitados em casa por sua parteira conhecida até duas semanas após o parto, o número de visitas varia, dependendo da necessidade da mulher e do bebê. Depois que ela recebe cuidados das enfermeiras que cuidam da primeira infância e com seis semanas ela tem uma consulta com seu clínico geral (2).

DSC04554

O modelo do Hospital St George de continuidade de cuidado foi o primeiro em New South Wales, mas hoje há muitos deles em torno de NSW e ao redor da Austrália! Especialmente em área rural, porque realmente tem um melhor custo-efectividade e melhores resultados. É também têm esse modelo de cuidado continuado para a mulheres que escolhem dar à luz no hospital ou têm uma gravidez de alto risco (2).

Jane também disse na entrevista:
DSC04598

“Durante o pré-natal eu me concentro em normalizar as coisas e não me preocupar demais. Eu tento ajudar a mulher a se sentir confiante, dizendo que ela pode! Seu corpo foi feito para isso, e como ele funciona é simplesmente fantástico!

A maneira como você aborda pode mudar a forma como a mulher enxerga as coisas. Eu ouvi uma mulher dizendo que na sua primeira consulta com o obstetra, ele disse que ela era muito pequena e o marido muito grande, então eles deviam pensar em ter um cesárea…. Isso não vai fazer a mulher mias confiante para dar à luz. Não é apenas uma coisa física, é como você aborda. Se ela entrar em trabalho de parto muito positiva, ela está mais propensa a ter um parto natural.

O parto é tão diferente para cada indivíduo, mas ao mesmo tempo é o mesmo … e transforma as pessoas. É um milagre!”

DSC04571

DSC04593
” Como nós confiamos nas flores para se abrirem para a nova vida, da mesma forma podemos confiar no Parto.”

1- Brodie, Pat and Homer, Caroline. 2009. “Transforming the culture of a Marternity Service.” In Birth Models That Work, eds. Robbie Davis-Floyd, Lesley Barclay, Betty-Anne Daviss, and Jan Tritten. Berkeley: University of California Press, pp. 187-212.
2- McMurtrie, Jane. Calvette, Mayra. Parto pelo Mundo/ Birth Around the World. Sydney, Australia. December, 2011.

Você pode gostar...

2 Resultados

  1. Ellen Bal disse:

    Hi, I’m trying to find a midwife, it’s my first birth in Australia and they seem to do things different to New Zealand and I’m having trouble finding a midwife here, are you able to help me?

    I am 22weeks, due on the 29th of May.

    • Mayra disse:

      Hello Ellen!
      Where in Australia do you live dear?
      Would like to have a home birth, birth center?
      Yes, things are very diferent from NZ, but there are midwives in some areas.

Deixe uma resposta

O seu endereço de e-mail não será publicado. Campos obrigatórios são marcados com *